Muffin Tin Biscuits

I've always been a bit partial to cut-out biscuits. Never liked making drop biscuits, even if they were just going to be covered with gravy. 

As a result of this bias, I made a lot of crumbly biscuits when I started baking gluten-free. I also made a lot of biscuits that resembled bricks. As it turns out, the crumbly biscuits just didn't have enough guar gum, and the bricks had too much flour.

Not a hard problem to fix, but I also finally realized something. Drop biscuits are not that bad. And the results are a lot more consistent. 

Ironically, after all those batches of failed cut-out biscuits, drop biscuits have become the old faithful standby. 


As usual, I left my camera …somewhere… so these pictures were taken with my phone. Sorry 'bout the quality. :p

They're easy, consistent, and fast. They don't fall apart, and they're not heavy. What more could one ask?

Well, we could ask that they be flaky, but lets get real. We're talking about biscuits sans gluten here. From what I understand, gluten is an essential part of biscuit flaky-ness too bad for us. 

So here we go, my version of gluten-free drop biscuits. I do mine in muffin tins so that they retain a nice shape. This recipe is adapted from our community's cookbook. 

Gluten-Free Drop Biscuits

1c. gluten-free flour mix
1/4 t. salt
1t. baking powder
1t. guar gum
1T sugar (opt.)
1/4 c. cold butter, lard, or coconut oil*
1 small egg
1/2 c. milk

mix dry ingredients together. Cut in butter/oil. Mix in egg and milk and divide among six greased muffin tins. Bake at 400 degrees for  approximately 15 minutes or until golden brown. 

*If you want to use coconut oil, make sure it's cold. I also recommend mixing it half and half with either butter (my preference) or lard.

Enjoy! 

Linked with: Made By Monday, MIYMM, A southern FairyTale, Tip Junkie, Hearth And Soul, Fat Tuesday, Tasty Tuesday, WFMW, Real Food Wednesday, Crystal & Co., Full Plate Thursday, GNOWFGLINS, Sippy Cup Chronicleshttp://www.sippycupchronicles.com/, Weekend Potluck,  Your Green Resource, Be Different Act Normal, Sweet As Sugar Cookies, Six Sister's Stuff

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Anne | Aug 12, 2012, 6:35 PM

I am just getting brave enough to start to experiment more with baking, but so far I have definitely had good results with the corn flours. The cornmeal does make it coarser, but I often find that a lot of GF baked goods are too cakelike for my taste, so the cornmeal (or buckwheat or oat bran) helps with that. I do think I will add a little extra liquid next time if I use that much cornmeal again, just due to the coarser nature of it. Usually I have been using corn flour/masa and that works extremely well too, plus it is so much cheaper and way more accessible around here than any of the other flours. The corn flour/masa bakes up as fine and delicate as rice flour, but without the gritty texture. Most recipes that call for rice flour as the main flour, I have started replacing it with the corn flour because I have liked the results so much.
I am looking forward to trying out more of your recipes!! I just made a pot of chicken noodle soup with the egg noodles (I used corn flour/corn starch) and it tastes so wonderful!

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Elise New | Aug 12, 2012, 5:14 PM

Aww, Anne, your comment made my day! Do you use cornmeal a lot? I’ve been wanting to get some corn in bulk to grind - hopefully a lot finer than cornmeal - to give some variety to our grains. Corn meal just seemed too coarse!

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Anne | Aug 12, 2012, 8:35 AM

Yum! I was originally going to make the crockpot cinnamon biscuits, but was short on time, so I baked them in the oven with some melted butter and cinnamon sugar. I adjusted the recipe a bit because I have found that I usually prefer the texture of corn flours over rice, and I was feeling too lazy to cut in the butter. smile I doubled the recipe and used 1 cup of cornmeal (I had originally planned to use the masa, but grabbed the wrong one), 1/2 cup oat flour, and 1/2 cup cornstarch (I am so glad I learned from you about using more starch in recipes), and then I used just under 1/2 cup of regular vegetable oil. I did use xanthan gum but that’s because I have both and it was the first one I saw (another good tip I learned from you about guar gum being cheaper), and then on the milk I used just a tad less to make up for the liquid oil. I think I could have used the full amount of milk without a problem. They came out fantastic! This recipe has the honor of being printed out nicely and stuck to the fridge for easy access. Thanks!

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Elise New | Jul 31, 2012, 9:23 AM

Oh yes, loads of fun. Haha!

Well, the challenge can actually be kind of fun sometimes. smile

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Diana | Jul 31, 2012, 8:34 AM

Elise, it wouldn’t surprise me if the problem with the pancakes/waffles was probably a combination of dairy-free milk and the alternative flours. I’ve used my regular pancake recipe (one egg, one cup flour, 3/4 cup milk, and a little sugar, oil, and salt) and substituted homemade rice milk and it turned out fine. But I can imagine that using other milk and the flours might make it too bland. Isn’t allergy-friendly cooking fun….. wink

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Elise New | Jul 31, 2012, 8:03 AM

Thank you Lisa!

I was basing the taste/lack of browning on my experience with dairy-free waffles and pancakes. Not exactly a smashing success! But I used homemade rice milk in them, so that could have been the issue.

I will say that the dairy and egg free millet and flax pancakes were pretty good, so maybe it was a problem with the combo of dairy free plus bland grains (rice, brown rice, and cornstarch).

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Lisa Reynoso | Jul 30, 2012, 10:42 PM

I use soy and other dairy-free milks in recipes all the time, and I have never had a problem. My son is allergic to dairy as well as gluten—and eggs, too, all of which make GF baking a bit tricky. However, I’ve been modestly successful with things like biscuits and cookies and muffins. Soymilk works well, especially unsweetened (I make my own), and my son, who is allergic to soy, gets hemp milk in his biscuits. I haven’t noticed a problem with browning or flavor. So try it and let us know how whatever milk you use turns out!

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Elise New | Jul 30, 2012, 7:56 PM

To be honest, I’ve never tried it. I imagine the taste would be a bit bland, and that they probably wouldn’t brown very well, but beyond that I have no idea.

I *have* sucessfully used yogurt though. HTH

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Bekka | Jul 30, 2012, 5:31 PM

Can you sub dairy-free milks in this recipe?

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Elise | Apr 27, 2012, 5:43 PM

I think tapioca flour out to work well. I mainly use cornstarch because it’s a lot cheaper. You may need to increase the starch ratio to half though to make up for the… less starchiness.

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Lisa Reynoso | Apr 27, 2012, 2:08 PM

Oops, never mind. I just saw the link. You wouldn’t know of a whole grain GF biscuit recipe, would you? I’ve been toying with a recipe I have that is like half starch, and trying to cut it down. But I think arrowroot starch isn’t the best for savory biscuits (gives them a funny, sweetish smell), and he can’t have corn either. I’m going to try tapioca flour next batch; it’s very starchy, but not exactly a true starch. All I know is I’ve got a very picky 3-year-old GF boy, and I’m trying desperately to come up with things he will eat—and that I can cook in bulk and freeze for days when I just don’t have time to bake!

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Lisa Reynoso | Apr 27, 2012, 2:04 PM

What is in the GF mix? I haven’t ever tried making one, and I certainly can’t buy one, since my son is totally allergic to potatoes as well as a million other foods (okay, slight exaggeration, but it’s a pretty long list).

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Diana | Apr 12, 2012, 8:46 AM

I have done that too, but I hate washing the muffin pan so I don’t do it all the time smile Also, thanks for the tip about using the coconut oil cold. I haven’t used it in biscuits yet, but knowing me I’d have tried to use it lukewarm the first time and regretted it!

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Miz Helen | Apr 6, 2012, 11:36 AM

These are sure great looking biscuits that would be great with any meal.  Hope you have a fabulous Celebration Week End and thank you so much for sharing with Full Plate Thursday.
Come Back Soon!
Miz Helen

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Elise New | Apr 6, 2012, 9:24 AM

Thanks for the comments ya’ll!

@Jessica, that’s great! Your mom and grandmother are smart. smile

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Wonderwoman | Apr 5, 2012, 6:30 PM

Great idea to use a muffin tin for biscuits!

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Jessica | Apr 5, 2012, 5:25 PM

This is what I thought biscuits were supposed to look like. That is until I got married. My husband ask me to get a new biscuit pan when I went grocery shopping. When I returned I had a muffin pan. Lol my mom and grandmother both made their biscuits in a muffin pan.

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April @ The 21st Century Housewife | Apr 3, 2012, 4:05 PM

What an excellent idea making your biscuits in muffin tins. This is such a useful gluten free recipe, and your biscuits look delicious!